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“To achieve the relatively high rates of intake (up to 90 grams/hour) needed to optimize results in events lasting longer than three hours, athletes should practice consuming carbohydrates during training to develop an individual strategy, and should make use of sport foods and drinks containing carbohydrate combinations that will maximize absorption from the gut and minimize gastrointestinal disturbances.”
There are so many tricks, shortcuts, and gimmicks out there on achieving optimal ketosis – I’d suggest you don’t bother with any of that. Optimal ketosis can be accomplished through dietary nutrition alone (aka just eating food). You shouldn’t need a magic pill to do it. Just stay strict, remain vigilant, and be focused on recording what you eat (to make sure your carb and protein intake are correct).
The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet that in medicine is used primarily to treat difficult-to-control (refractory) epilepsy in children. The diet forces the body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates. Normally, the carbohydrates contained in food are converted into glucose, which is then transported around the body and is particularly important in fueling brain function. However, if little carbohydrate remains in the diet, the liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies. The ketone bodies pass into the brain and replace glucose as an energy source. An elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood, a state known as ketosis, leads to a reduction in the frequency of epileptic seizures.[1] Around half of children and young people with epilepsy who have tried some form of this diet saw the number of seizures drop by at least half, and the effect persists even after discontinuing the diet.[2] Some evidence indicates that adults with epilepsy may benefit from the diet, and that a less strict regimen, such as a modified Atkins diet, is similarly effective.[1] Potential side effects may include constipation, high cholesterol, growth slowing, acidosis, and kidney stones.[3]
"The keto diet is primarily used to help reduce the frequency of epileptic seizures in children. While it also has been tried for weight loss, only short-term results have been studied, and the results have been mixed. We don't know if it works in the long term, nor whether it's safe," warns registered dietitian Kathy McManus, director of the Department of Nutrition at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women's Hospital.
If you’re looking to get a jump start on your health and fitness goals this year, you may be thinking about trying the ketogenic diet. Maybe you’ve heard the phrase before — it’s a huge diet buzzword — but aren’t sure what it means. Here’s a primer: The ketogenic diet is an eating plan that drives your body into ketosis, a state where the body uses fat as a primary fuel source (instead of carbohydrates), says Stacey Mattinson, RDN, who is based in Austin, Texas.
There’s also some evidence that it might help with type 2 diabetes. “An emerging body of research is finding that a keto plan may have some real benefits thanks to its ability to improve the body’s ability to use insulin and also help control appetite, which can result in easier weight loss,” says Karen Ansel, R.D.N., co-author of Healthy in a Hurry. 

"If you're going to do keto, there's a better and a worse way to do it," registered dietician Kim Yawitz told Everyday Health. "Loading your plate with meats, and especially processed meats, may increase your risk for kidney stones and gout... High intake of animal proteins makes your urine more acidic and increases calcium and uric acid levels. This combination makes you more susceptible to kidney stones, while high uric acid can increase your risk for gout."
The bottom line is that there have not been enough scientific studies, especially longer term ones, to really determine all the potential risks and benefits of the keto diet. Many of the claims out there on the Internet, social media, or television in either direction are anecdotal, meaning that they are individuals telling stories about what has supposedly been their experiences. Take everything you hear that is not supported by scientific evidence with a grain of salt (but not too much salt because too much can be bad for you.)

2) I have a hard time eating real food soon after rides/workouts. I had used Hammer Recoverite (1scoop instead of suggest serving of 2 and add 1scoop whey isolate protein) in the past because I feel a significant difference the day after with less muscle fatigue. Then I read a previous posts on your opinion of post-workout supplementation ( https://bengreenfieldfitness.com/2013/07/what-to-… ) and I realized the primary ingredient in Recoverite is maltodextrin. Since the 2013 article, has anything changed in your research that you might suggest I add PWO to aid in the muscle fatigue/recovery? (In other words, Is there anything more healthy I can take to replace the Recoverite or should the aminos/electrolytes/carbs/MCT’s from the recipe in this article be sufficient?) Thanks in advance, I appreciate all of your work!
The Dr. Formulated Keto line of products is fully transparent, compliant to the keto guidelines and designed to be convenient—we’ve done the math for you—just mix. Crafted for those seeking to enter into ketosis or stick to a low-carbohydrate diet for weight loss and health purposes, all Dr. Formulated products are Keto Certified, Paleo Friendly and clean: Non-GMO Project Verified and Truly Grass Fed.
Weight loss is my favorite side effect of keto. Coming in a close 2nd, 3rd, and 4th, and 5th is higher energy levels, no bingeing, clear skin, and lowered blood glucose! I don’t mind telling people that I’m Keto...or shutting down a conversation where they try and spew their online doctor degree about how I’m killing myself. This WOE work is for me, my bloodwork is the best it has ever been, and I feel great. Keto on, friends.
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