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1. If a set number ketones in the blood is an indicator that my body has transitioned to ketosis and not necessarily the cause (the cause being limited access to glycogen because of limited carb intake) then how does using exogenous ketones put me in ketosis as opposed to mimic being in ketosis (because when measuring blood ketones suddenly there are more because I put them there, I didn’t create them)?
In a state of ketosis, your body breaks fat down in the liver and converts it into ketones to be used for energy. Fat doesn't generate an insulin response, so insulin levels remain stable. This makes it much harder to store excess fat, and easier to tap into body fat stores for energy. Not only will this allow you to maintain your weight, but it will greatly encourage weight loss.
If you have a functioning pancreas that can produce insulin – i.e. you don’t have type 1 diabetes – it would be extremely hard or, most likely, impossible to get ketoacidosis even if you tried. That’s because high ketone levels result in release of insulin, that shuts down further ketone production. In other words, the body has a safety net that normally makes it impossible for healthy people to get ketoacidosis.

The keto diet changes the way your body converts food into energy. Eating a lot of fat and very few carbs puts you in ketosis, a metabolic state where your body burns fat instead of carbs for fuel. When your body is unable to get glucose from carbs, your liver converts fatty acids from your diet into ketones, an alternative source of energy. Burning ketones in place of glucose reduces inflammation and spurs weight loss.[1]
Shifting your metabolism and achieving ketosis may speed up weight loss and result in other health benefits, like more energy and a lower blood pressure. But while ketosis is a preferred nutritional state for some people, it isn’t recommended for everyone — and it’s not a good long-term eating approach due to its restrictive nature, which may lead to potentially dangerous nutritional deficiencies.

The DNA test does not necessarily take into account your goals (e.g. breathholding, Ironman, cognition, etc.) and if your goals would benefit from ketosis, then you may want to choose it as a dietary strategy even though it could indeed be true that for FAT LOSS a higher carb intake may suit you. So it all depends on your goals. Or you could just us the supplements like ketones AND eat more carbs and get "best of both worlds".
After 2 years in ketosis suddenly I find my blood glucose has risen to high levels even while in ketosis. I thought it was the dawn phenomenon, stress hormones like cortisol but now I am beginning to think I am eating too many exongenous keytones like too much MCT oil? I am not taking exogenous keytone supplements but wondering if too much oil/ fat in the diet generates exogenous keytones which inhibits the livers production of endogenous keytones. I have read if the liver is producing endogenous keytones it is not at the same time producing glucose through gluconeogenisis?
A: The amount of weight you lose is entirely dependent on you. Obviously adding exercise to your regimen will speed up your weight loss. Cutting out things that are common “stall” causes is also a good thing. Artificial sweeteners, dairy, wheat products and by-products (wheat gluten, wheat flours, and anything with an identifiable wheat product in it).

Carbohydrates are necessary for the conversion of inactive thyroid hormone to active thyroid hormone, and if you’re on an extremely strict low carbohydrate diet, then you may actually be limiting this conversion. Your TSH is what tells your thyroid gland to “release more hormone,” so your TSH rises when your thyroid gland is underactive, or conversion of inactive to active thyroid hormone is inadequate. A high TSH means that the pituitary gland is releasing its hormone to try to get the thyroid to respond and produce more thyroid hormone. Because of inadequate carbohydrates, TSH will often elevate in a high-fat, low-carber – indicating potential for long-term thyroid and metabolic damage.
For any long 90+ minute workouts or competitions for which glycogen depletion is a potential issue, use Glycofuse, but use half of the recommended serving of it, and add one scoop of Catalyte electrolytes, one scoop of Aminos, and one serving of medium chain triglycerides in the form of Brain Octane, KetoCaNa or KETO//OS (pick your poison, it’s up to you).
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